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 Just thinking... 
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I was so disgusted when I saw the different pictures of the lynchings. How in the world could people view this as the right, just way to prosecute people? It's sick, and it made me so upset thinking that there were mobs of people who witnessed these lychings. How many of these people who died were innocent? I know many of them did not receive a fair trial, and they were put on display and died horrible deaths; many were burned, shot, or sliced. People actually thought this was entertaining? I read one postcard that said Italian immigrants in Tampa were accused of union sympathy. Americans thought their country would become overthrown and attacked because people were questioning and uprising. After the immigrants died, people costumed them and glued cotton sideburns to their face in order to ridicule them.

I was thinking about the other article, "Why Johnny Can't Disobey" and realized there is a huge connection between that article and the Tampa lynchings. The Italian immigrants were accused of agreeing with unions. People formed unions because they were upset at the current working conditions. Isn't this critically thinking about something and wanting change? Isn't this what the article is stressing that people need to do? It is amazing that when people stood up for a change needing to be made, they were seriously attacked. The article warned society that they needed to become independent thinkers. I am proud of the immigrants who did stand up for unions. They were going against society's norm by questioning working conditions. I hope we can learn from these people and voice our opinions, even if it is dangerous.

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Laura Greene

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Sun Jan 22, 2006 4:46 pm
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A descendent of the original purchaser expressed the remorse the townspeople felt upon recognizing the victim as the town drunk, who had "merely stumbled into the child, and not even torn her dress."


This is a dirty part of American history that we're going to have to come to terms with as a society. Hopefully our culture has evolved and keep crimes like these where they belong, in the past.

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-Rodney Woods

"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And when you look long into an abyss, the abyss also looks into you" - Nietzsche


Sun Jan 22, 2006 8:33 pm
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It's really hard to grasp that things like this really happened in the United States. I think that our generation gets this idea of what a great nation we are and have always been, and forgets about the past. I have a lot of pride in our country and what we stand for, but I am continually amazed at the horrible things that our ancestors did to each other. The worst part is that prejudice still exists today in so many ways. As future teachers, we have to make sure that we get rid of our stereotypes and provide a safe environment for all of our students. I know that we have the ability to change lives if we take the time to be the best we can for our students.

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Kelly Allen


Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:40 am
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The sad thing is, is that prejudice and racism does still exist. There are still Neo-Nazi's, KKK and many other hate groups who all believe their cause is for the greater good. It is not only thriving in these groups but i would say in most schools around this country, whether it is secret or open. Perhaps through teachers who are aware posibble problems due to racism or prejudice we can rid the students of their ignorance. But how do we approach it? I'm sure it happens every day. These notions are deeply rooted in children from before they can walk, how do you shake something so deep?

Teresa Holden

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Teresa Holden


Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:20 pm
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Looking at the first few pictures of the lynchings I thought to myself that if was something that just happened a long long time ago. Then seeing the dates on the pictures I was dumbfounded to see that some happened in my grandparents lifetime. What a difference fifty years makes in our history of this great country or what I thought was a great country. How could the people of the United States actually do this to one another? The answer is hate, prejudice, what ever you want to call it. The sad part of all of this is that it still exists in our schools today, hatred that is. Sometimes it occurs because parents of students have not changed their opinions of people and still think like their great grand parents. These parents don't exhibit good social and humane characteristics, so what can we expect from their children. I can see how the African American race looks at caucasians the way they do. They don't trust them. As teachers, we need to address to our students about diversity and that every one of us are equal as humans. Everyone in this world is different from one another, but the one thing that we all share in common is that we all are people with thoughts, feelings, ambitions, etc. We are not something that one can think is less than the other and just shoot or hang because of the color of the skin. So parents and future parents, think about what you are telling your children about diversity in todays world. Don't let this crap still exist. Now, the authorities will actually punish people who display hatred to others. My last thought is this. How did we let this happen for so long and not do anything about it? Thank you to my grandparents who brought me up with good ethics and morals.

Matt Rowe

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Matt Rowe

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Wed Jan 25, 2006 11:33 am
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First off, I agree with Matt. I thought originally, going onto the site, that most of the lynchings would have been dated a long time ago. I was shocked to read dates and places and find out that some of them were not that long ago. It amazes me that people would go to extremes of torturing a person so much. I believe that if a person is guilty, they're guilty, and depending on the extent of the crime, they should be punished accordingly. But, in order to come to that decision, they must have a trial. How do you know for certain that a person is guilty without a trial? I know some innocent people are convicted for crimes because of being framed or just coincidental evidence against them that seems too good to be true, but I think everyone is entitled to a trial, regardless. I can't imagine living in a time period where people were just murdered without having a fair trial. It's shocking to me that some of the pictures were not too long ago. People will hate, for whatever reason, but it is up to us as future teachers to make our classroom as pleasant a place as possible, and teach our students that everyone is entitled to the same rights.

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Lauren Shook


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Wed Jan 25, 2006 2:21 pm
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I was really sickened when I looked through the pictures of the lynchings. It's shocking to me, in a way, that our human race could have been so cruel. We've all talked about these things happening in class, but it just doesn't sink in until you see the pictures. It makes me feel ashamed that
Americans could have been a part of something so awful.

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Luci Osborne


Wed Jan 25, 2006 2:22 pm
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I am kinda getting of the topic slightly, but lets say that all of those who were tortured and killed were guilty of a hanes crime. What would have been done to them if cruelty was not enforced on them? They would have been either let free, or they would have to spend the rest of their time on earth in prison. Now what about today. People who kill countless amounts of people sit in prison for the rest of their life, but they get benefits. They get free food (as bad as it is), a place to live for free, leisure time, books to read, etc. These people are getting off so easy. Now I am not saying what happen in the past was exceptable, but atleast something was done to counteract their actions. Today, tax payers are paying for these types of people to live a life that somebody think is "not that bad". People who commit crimes nowadays, see no real punishment for their actions. Maybe what we need in this country is a more strict capital punishment in all states. Texas has it right. An eye for an eye, a life for a life.

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Matt Rowe

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Wed Jan 25, 2006 3:46 pm
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By the way, yall probably notice that i am not a good speller. Some proof of that is that i misspelled the word "file" in my school spelling bee. Please say a pray for me!!

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Matt Rowe

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Wed Jan 25, 2006 3:48 pm
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I completely agree with you guys and it saddens me that racism still exists today.

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Samantha McCrary


Sun Jan 29, 2006 3:53 pm
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