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 treating students equally 
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I really found the readings and discussion from class last night very insightful. A lot of times, I think teachers, parents, students, and everyone kind of overlook how students are being treated. I think it's a hard thing to realize when a teacher is treating one type of student a certain because of how much money their family may have, etc. or treating another student another way because their family lives on the street. I wish that there could be a little "watcher" in each classroom that would catch teachers treating their students unequally and help them see wha they were doing. But, unfortunately there is not. All that we can do is take what we learn from our classes and apply it to our own classrooms.

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Luci Osborne


Thu Feb 02, 2006 10:00 am
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Quote:
I wish that there could be a little "watcher" in each classroom that would catch teachers treating their students unequally


When I was in 11th grade I had a brand new right out of college teacher for US History. Mr. ______ would videotape his classes and then watch it to critique himself. We never realized we were being taped because he just set the camera on the desk and went on with his lesson. I don't know if there's any legal issues with this but it seems like it would be a good way for us to see how we're behaving in class.

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-Rodney Woods

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Thu Feb 02, 2006 11:31 am
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Yes I agree with that. A video camera would be a nice touch, if you could get around all the legal issues. If a principal or another faculty member came and sat in on the class, it might put too much pressure not only on the teacher, but on the students. It would be an excellent way for us as teachers to go back and critique OURSELVES on how we're treating students. It's a view we may never get to see any other way, and the first step to fixing a problem is to realize you have one in the first place. :P

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Nicole Stack

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Thu Feb 02, 2006 7:29 pm
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Fair is not always equal.

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Danny Jugan

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Fri Feb 03, 2006 8:46 am
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I was thinking about what you all were writing about and the activity that Dr. Turner did with dividing us up into different income groups. I always knew that families had different income amounts, but I did not think that it had such a huge impact on students' treatment in the class. As I listened to the comments in class, I realized how many factors can cause mistreatment due to income. I have had so many experiences in classrooms where teachers would be angry that a child made their posters on cardboard rather than poster board. My first impression was usually that they did not care about their grades. But, now I started thinking, what if they didn't have time to go to the store? What if their parents could not afford poster board? I think if teachers knew that students could not afford things, they would be more understanding. But, I wonder how many teachers actually take time to figure those things out- or do they just automatically give the student a lower grade? What about the students who fall asleep in class because they were up during the night taking care of younger siblings? Teachers yell at students who fall asleep and personally take offense. They think that students do not care about their class and don't want to be there. But, did the teacher talk to the student privately about why they were falling asleep? Maybe. I think we as teachers need to be patient and look outside the rules sometimes. We need to figure out why before we generalize and assume. I hope I can do that, because I know how hurtful it is for a teacher to assume something and it not be true. We just need to be careful and compassionate.

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Laura Greene

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Fri Feb 03, 2006 3:27 pm
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As for video taping your teaching, as a PE major we are required multiple times to video tape our teaching, then review it to improve our teaching techniques. As I viewed these tapes I could see what strategies worked and what did not, by seeing how the class responded to my instruction. I also saw where I needed to implement behavior management plans. I recommend taping your instruction to all prospective teachers, it is a great way to see your strengths and weaknesses, and how you treat your students.

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Burl Greene


Fri Feb 03, 2006 3:35 pm
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The example about doing the project on posterboard verus cardboard really hit home to me. I can also remember kids in elementary school who did not turn in science projects at all because they could not afford posterboard. They would rather recieve a failing grade than be embarassed to turn in a project on cardboard. I can remember thinking that they didnt care about their grades. I think that as a teacher, we need to be involved with each student. We need to know what exactly is going on at home. We need to let the parents know that if for some reason they cannot afford the materials, we can provide them. Lots of companies will donate materials to classrooms. I think that as teachers we need to find a way to make money not an issue when concerining education.

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Samantha McCrary


Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:16 am
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I work at The Learning Tree. A cardboard science board is $4.99, and I am told that this is pretty cheap. I think that sometimes teachers/people in general underestimate the value of $5. As far as a science board goes, that's not all you would have to buy for a great project, and the costs add up.

Here's a little story about $5.

My mom teaches at a very poor(as in family income) country school. Before Christmas, she took all of her fourth graders to see The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. Probably 75% of the kids had never been to see a movie in the theater before. It costs $5 for the movie and the gas money to go. Out of about 40-50 kids, 10 could not even afford that, and the school paid. When they got there, a handful of the kids brought money for popcorn, but were not allowed to get it because for most of the kids, scraping up $5 extra was tough for the families. $5 doesn't seem that much to us, but it really can be a lot to other people.

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Kelly Allen


Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:14 pm
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I know that for me personally, I have to be careful not to hurt student's feelings and treat them all equally. From working in a daycare (I know I talk about this a lot but it's been my main experience with kids), I know it's easier to be more patient with the clean, behaved child rather than the dirty child whose shoes don't fit. Often times, the children who act out might be the ones who are homeless or living in horrible conditions. If you had to wear old clothes that didn't fit, couldn't bathe, or didn't have enough food to eat, I doubt you'd be very sociable. We have to consider that some of our students didn't wake up with the same advatages that other students did, so they're starting off behind the pack before they ever enter our classroom.

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Laurie Tate


Mon Feb 13, 2006 9:37 pm
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I totally agree with Laurie...not all children start their day with a nutritional breakfeast, a shower, or clean and fitting clothes. I know that I am not a happy camper without a pair of clean socks and underware to put on after a morning shower! As teachers we should not expect those children who do without (and we will more than likely know who they are) to be perfect little angels all the time. And, for some reason it is eaiser to have more paitents towards the clean misbehaving children than the dirty misbehaving children. I like the idea of having a video camera constantly filming...I hope never to make a child feel like i prefer one over the other!

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Anna Kate Shook
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Tue Feb 14, 2006 11:23 am
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The video camera technique seems very effective. There are teachers that prpocefully do not treat students equally though. I remember when I was in the third grade and I was asked to read something to an assembly in school. My homeroom teacher could not believe that I was asked. She made no efforts to conceal her dissatisfaction. This made me feel low and I felt that I was not worthy. I was a little wild in those days but that is no reason to act like she did.

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Scott Shannon


Wed Feb 15, 2006 9:59 am
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Lauries statement really hit home with me. I think that a teachers hardest job is treating all students equally. I work with pre-school children as a part-time job. It's really hard to get excited about working with children who misbehave frequently. I just try to put myself in their shoes & try to be patient. I have found that some of the children I have connected with the most have been underpriveldged students.

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Samantha McCrary


Mon Feb 20, 2006 8:59 pm
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