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 What WOULD you do? 
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We talked a lot the other day about what we would do in particular situations....I have no idea. I have ideas as to what I would do, and ways that I would hope I would be able to appropriately handle situations....but do you think that the fear or shock of certain situations would inhibit our reactions? I honestly hope not, but I was just wondering what anyone else thought.

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Laura Serio


Sat Apr 19, 2008 9:51 am
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I think as teachers the only thing we can do is to handle certain situations is to take a deep breath and then act in the way which you think best handles the situation. We are going to be approached with a lot of different situations. Since I am getting ready to do my student teaching in the fall, I have already thought about a lot of different situations that may arise and how I am going to handle them. However, there are going to be some crazy things to happen and the only thing we can do is try our best to be as prepared as possible.


Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:34 pm
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Hopefully we will be going over some more situations because it was great to think about these issues. Shock will certainly play a part and I know I am going to make some mistakes especially in the first few years. As Nick was saying trying to remain calm will be pertinent as tough as that maybe to do. After going to the Secondary Ed meeting on Thursday I learned that there is a whole class on Classroom Management. It is an hour long with a 3-hour per week lab. So if you have any free time in your schedule before student teaching it sounds helpful.

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Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:08 pm
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Honestly, it kind of freaks me out to think that I will be responsible for so many lives all at once and I can’t even imagine how I will handle certain situations. I think during my time I have always thought of my self going into the classroom in “Teacher modeâ€

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Jayme Fox


Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:41 pm
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I think you set the line straight on the first day. You let the students know what you expect of them and you give them a chance to tell you what they expect. But, you make it clear that the classroom is not a democracy. If a kid chooses to jump out of the window, they will be dealt with. If a kid will not behave, they will be dealt with. If a kid will not do there homework, they will be dealt with. It is impossible to come up with a response to every thinkable situation right now because every real-life situation has an infinite possibility of components (such as ADD, drug abuse, and hormones).

I think the best way to prepare yourself for these kinds of scenarios is to understand what your personal educational philosophy is, understand where your students come from and what problems they may have, and live to adapt your philosophy to fit the needs of your classroom. If you do that, most things will fall in place. For the things that don't, all the planning in the world could not prevent them from happening.

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Hoy Colson
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Mon Apr 21, 2008 12:33 am
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I agree with Hoy; I think that laying out explicit consequences on Day 1, while simultaneously demonstrating to the students that those rules will not be deviated from in most circumstances is important. However, I can't think of a more relativistic place than a classroom when it comes to rules. Relativism is a hard thing to achieve in a society of 280 million, but an easy and arguably necessary one in a society of 25-30 kids. Being aware of the lives of your students and what their lives are like outside of school is crucial, as well as letting them know that you share in their goals for school and life. Whatever your rules may be, the most important rule is that we are there for them, and not vice versa.

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Stephan Ostrander


Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:56 am
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To be perfectly honest, I don't pay much attention to what the teacher says he/she expects on the first day. I've had too much experience with a teacher backing out on things. I don't really think that you can set things straight on day one. You can give a general idea, but you're building a relationship with 25+ people and that takes time.

I agree that there are some situations for which you can prepare. I think that just hoping that you’ll do the right thing is not the best way to handle the difficult situations. However, I don’t even think that I could imagine all the different situations that could happen. So I definitely feel that shock or the fear of doing the wrong thing in an important situation would impact me. Realizing that I’m just not going to get it right all the time helps me and allows me to stay calm when something unexpected comes up.

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Jessica DuBose


Thu May 01, 2008 9:34 pm
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