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 Grading Procedures 
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I remember vaguely talking about this subject in class and found an awesome article on ways to improve these procedures:

1. Zeros are always unfair.
2. Don't confuse learning with behavior.
3. Grading is influenced by extraneous conditions.
4. Use "weighted" tests.
5. Decide whether you want tests for grading or for learning.
6. Never grade homework.
7. Avoid giving lower achieving students low grades.

There are a few other suggestions, but maybe some of you could visit http://teachers.net/gazette/MAY02/page.html and read about why these suggestions may be good or bad. It makes a lot of sense.

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Erica Shelton


Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:00 pm
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A lot of those points seem great, especially the one about grading being influenced by extraneous factors. However, if zeros are always unfair, then what grade do you give a child that doesn't do any of the work? Does s/he get at least partial credit for showing up? If I didn't turn in the final to Gayle, should she give me a zero or something like 5 points for at least considering to do the work?
Also, the statement "decide whether you want test for grading or for learning" is a little loaded as well, because often I feel like students could learn based on how they were graded on a particular assignment. I agree with not making tests the absolute focus, but grading is a necessary evil. Whatever your students choose to do in life, s/he will get graded on something, and they need to be prepared for that.
Finally, never grading homework sounds fantastic, but how many kids are actually going to do it if they get nothing for it? I know college kids that aren't self motivated enough to do homework simply for the experience.

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Stephan Ostrander


Wed Apr 30, 2008 9:18 am
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I liked the article that you put a link to, Erica. The author's best points were at the beginning. The suggestions made a lot more sense to me with the author's explanation. To me, though, the points all seem relative. I think that how you approach grading should work for your students and that one system might work for one and not for others. If you know your students and are sensitive to that knowledge then you can adjust your grading procedures to fit them.

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Jessica DuBose


Thu May 01, 2008 10:35 pm
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