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 SO we don't have to follow the standards... 
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So apparently we don't have to follow the standard course of study in our classrooms....any thoughts for or against this?

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Jacob


Thu Apr 10, 2008 10:01 pm
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I am not against using the SCS. I think that it provides a great basis and outline of what should and need to teach. I think that it is a great tool to help keep teachers on track of what comes next and things like that. However, it would be nice to know that if some topics don't get covered it won't have a major affect on your students. I like to think that as a teacher I have done my best to teach them as much content as possible. But like I said if something doesn't get covered I would like to think that it won't come back and haunt me or be detremental to my students and whether or not they pass.

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Danielle Underwood


Fri Apr 11, 2008 6:54 am
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I think that the SCS is a great tool for learning and for teaching but I dont think that you should have to follow it to a T. I think as long as you are using it as a guideline then it can work well but when teachers strictly follow the SCS and do not stray from it at all you are basically just teaching from the book and not allowing any outside sources to help lead in learning.

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Emily Nicholson


Fri Apr 11, 2008 4:12 pm
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I am one of those people that flourishes when there is a set path for me to follow and guidelines set before me. That being said I love have the SCS there to give me an FYI about what I need to teach somewhere in between the start and end of the semester. However, I don't like the fact that I am pushed so so SO very hard to follow the thing to a T and if I don't get something covered that comes back and falls on my head. If there could be a happy medium somewhere between having such a helpful guide to direct you and your teaching and the albatross that ends up being, I would be a very happy camper

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Caitlin Troutman


Sat Apr 12, 2008 11:44 pm
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I definitely agree with what everyone else is saying. The SCS should be used more as a guideline than as a strict standard for what you must follow every day when you will be teaching. I believe that the SCS should provide you with overall goals, but you should also allow yourself some freedom by being able to part with the SCS if needed. I believe that being able to stray from the SCS will benefit our students because if the students are showing a lot of interest in a certain topic we could provide them with a day to research their interest and continue our discussion. A big part of learning deals with the curiosities of our students. If our students are curious then we should definitely allow them more time to spend on any given topic.

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Sarah Robinson


Sun Apr 13, 2008 12:55 pm
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It kind of bothered me how some people on Thursday made it seem like they will follow the SCS so strictly when they become teachers. I believe the SCS should be used as a guideline, like many have been saying. There will be many topics that are not going to take a long time to be taught, which is good because this will leave room for topics that particularly interest your class. I agree with Sarah in that if your class is really interested in a topic, we should make sure we make time to discuss the topic more because this only enhances their learning experience. I know this will be difficult at times because of the EOG and other standardized tests, but I feel like it is important for teachers to use the SCS as a guideline. This also allows teachers to not just teach straight from the book.

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Lauren Blackwelder


Sun Apr 13, 2008 3:59 pm
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In the future, I hope that I am not routinely following the SCS day by day. I believe that if you keep a pace and do not allow for moderations for your different types of students then you will not be addressing the students needs to learn and succeed in the future. If you do not moderate your lessons according to your students and their levels of understanding then you are not helping your students. I believe the SCS should be used as a guideline inside your classroom to help you set a pace for each class you work with. In my mind the SCS is a guide in itself that will help you teach to the abilties of your students.


Sun Apr 13, 2008 9:21 pm
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I won't be using the SCS in my classroom because more than likely I will be teaching Pre-K and younger so I will be using what is called the Creative Curriculum. I agree with what all of you are saying but to change it up a bit, what as a teacher will you do when your principle comes up to you and says "Why are you focusing on (blank) in your classroom? How is it connecting back to the SCS?" Just a thought.... How would you react and how would you show him that what you are doing benefits the students just as much and even covers some of the skills they need to have.

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Jenna F


Mon Apr 14, 2008 8:19 am
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Like Caitlin, I also love having the SCS as a guideline, but I hate having to follow it so strictly. I think the SCS should be used only as a guideline in most classes, but not ones with EOCs. Hopefully I'll be teaching U.S. history, which unfortunately has an EOC. EOC scores reflect on me as a teacher, and I really want to be able to get everything covered in order for my students to do well on the test. Also for secondary majors, most people tend to forget that we only have 90 days to cover the material rather than 180 days.

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Merry Lauren Futch


Mon Apr 14, 2008 9:27 pm
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As a pre-k teacher I will be using the creative curriculum, which is somewhat like the SCS. It discusses the different developmental areas and the stages according to age. I feel that I will use this as more a a guideline or basis for why I am planning and doing certain activities.

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Jessica Smith


Tue Apr 15, 2008 3:11 pm
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I think that the SCS, as many of you have stated, is a great guideline for teachers to know what kind of content they need to cover in a certain grade level. I don't think that it should be the only source of help though. I think that finding help from other sources will make lessons interesting and fun and appropriate for the age level. Some people cannot see past that and i am not sure if that is the way in which teachers should use the SCS. If this happens then where will the creative, fun and inspirational teachers go? I personally will not be using the SCS with my age group but i have a similar guide that i will use to help me plan provocations and teaching opportunities for my children. It also focuses on the developmental readiness of children which i think is something that should be focused more in other grade levels.

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Nadia Rubio


Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:20 pm
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I think that SCS is, as most of you said, an awesome guideline, but it should be just that, a guideline. If every teacher followed the SCS to a T, would education really be that fun for the kids? I personally think that the best course of action would use it, along with other sources you could easily find, as a model by which you create your own creative and interesting lesson plans.

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Ryan Dunlevy


Thu Apr 17, 2008 8:49 am
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Just to clarify for those of you who won't teach high school. The SCS is set by the state and teachers input, they do not write textbooks. Textbook companies are the ones how put out textbooks. You can easily follow the standards by using outside sources, in fact it would be a poor teacher who did not. And if you don't teach them the things on the SCS you will not directly he hurt, however when the students miss that section of the final exam because you didn't think it was important to talk about the civil rights movement, people might be unhappy.

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Jacob


Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:43 pm
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To reply to Jenna's question, one of my Literacy, Technology and Instruction professors stresses that when we are grading our students, especially if we use rubrics, make the rubric VERY specific to a standard that goes along with what you're doing. That way, if a teacher/principal/someone higher up DOES pop in your room and say "hey, what are you doing with these kids? How does this relate to the SCS?" You can whip out your rubric, which uses specific standard language and relates to the SCS, and you're covered.

I myself HATE creating rubrics, but I can see that my professor has a point. If you want to make sure that your butt is covered, design grading rubrics for what you're doing, and relate it to the standard. Even if you're not grading the students on that assignment, have a rubric prepared to show anyone that might question what you're doing (saves time of explaining yourself).

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Holly Riddle


Sat Apr 26, 2008 1:03 pm
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