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 Delpit 
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I really enjoyed reading this article. While the article focused mainly on the issue of power and race, I found that the issues discussed can be applied to any educational setting. One example that I have personally witnessed can be found on p. 30.

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"I have frequently heard schools call poor parents "uncaring" when parents respond to the school's urging, saying, "But that's the school's job.""


When students are disciplined at my high school, we call home to make the parents aware of the situation. Often, parents will respond with "What is the school gonna do about it" or "That's your problem". Usually, I am appalled that parents respond this way. I've never once thought that these parents were just not aware of the rules and codes associated in the "educational culture of power". These parents are from another culture with different rules and codes. While I might not respond the way these parents do, I will definitley try not to judge.

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Callie Grubb


Sat Nov 15, 2008 8:06 pm
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I found the discussion on p. 35 and 36 insightful. Delpit discusses teacher authority and how students (particularly of different races) may interpret commands/requests by teachers.

The discussion made me think about classroom management and why some teachers may have a harder time than others controlling students. Less referrals come from classroom situations in which the teacher is more authoritative.

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Callie Grubb


Tue Nov 18, 2008 7:50 pm
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Even though we do not have a large black population in our school system, this article made me think so much about the language diversity that we do have among our students in our classrooms. We have students who come to our classes saying, "you'ins, ain't, we'uns and many other colloquial expressions that are common to this area. Should we try to correct them and tell them they are wrong?

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Sandra Peterson


Wed Nov 19, 2008 8:32 am
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I'm going to answer this, "Yes, and no." I think Delpit's article will give us a great basis for discussing when the answer should be yes, and when it should be no. And, as Callie suggests, this has to hinge on us being explicit about a culture of power in schools.

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Gayle Turner


Wed Nov 19, 2008 12:31 pm
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I could identify greatly with what was written in the latter part of the article. In college I had a black roommate. One afternoon he asked me to proofread a paper he had written. I would have expected better from my middle school kids. However, it was not hard to tell he would be an excellent teacher. When it came time for graduation he was unable to get his teaching certificate because he could never pass the praxis exam. Today, he is an elementary p.e. teacher in Richmond, VA (still having never passed the praxis). I imagine that his writing skills have never improved, but I would put money on the fact that he is one of the best p.e. teachers in Richmond city schools. I'm not for sure he would have been as successful in middle or high school, but it would have been a shame if someone who can make a difference in childrens lives had not had that opportunity because of a failed system of children in inner cities.

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Dustin H. Farmer


Wed Nov 19, 2008 3:19 pm
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We have several students who are in this situation at my school. When some of these students are corrected they get very defensive and shut down when their teachers try to correct them. Then they seem to get a chip on their shoulder after an incounter like this. While some want to be corrected and truly want you to show them when they make these types of mistakes, and are very open to these experiences.

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Travis Richardson


Wed Nov 19, 2008 3:30 pm
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