View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:18 pm



Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
 Banned Books 
Author Message
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 4:19 pm
Posts: 27
Books are an authors expression, their way of speaking out to the world through their creativity. Do you think by banning books, authors are not being allowed their freedom of speech? Also, by telling our students what is and isn't appropriate to read, are we hindering our students from being exposed to the differences of the world and sheltering them too much?

_________________
Katelyn McMillan


Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:50 am
Profile
All-star
All-star
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 11:41 pm
Posts: 35
Post 
I don't think we're denying the authors their freedom of speech - we're just trying to force our beliefs of what is appropriate onto someone else. They're still allowed to write the book, so I guess they still get that freedom of speech. That's not to say I agree with the banning books or censorship.

I agree with your second question to an extent. When we ban books that talk about less than pretty subjects, we create a world that doesn't exist. Our world isn't all cookies and ice cream with happy endings and innocent stories. All those topics that get a book banned...they happen all the time. So yes, I think we're sheltering students and denying them an opportunity to read about something that probably relates to them. But also, I think banning a book is one of the fastest way to get a student interested in reading it, haha.

_________________
Natalie Brady


Thu Mar 26, 2009 1:05 pm
Profile
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:41 pm
Posts: 24
Post 
I love that last line about the fastest way to get a student to read a book is to ban it. I think that we need to remember that is is by no means a majority of people who want a particular book banned most of the time. I don't know the numbers but I doubt that it's even close to even. I believe that most parents are glad to see their child reading and what they are reading doesn't mean as much. I could think of a few books that I wouldn't want to have a child read (I have one on my mind right now) but it's not like a young child is even going to think about reading something that has more information than just a good clean story. I also don't think it's in most authors interest to write a book that is not suitable for the age group they intend it for. Their might be a few that want to get some point across and attempt to do it towards younger children, but why would a school library even put a book like that into circulation. In my honest opinion, their are a few parents out their who feel as if THEY have a point to get across and that if they scream and whine loud enough and ruffle enough feathers, they will and usually do get what they want.

_________________
William Joseph Vreeland


Sat Mar 28, 2009 11:50 am
Profile
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 1:32 pm
Posts: 28
Post 
I also agree with the statement that the fastest way to get a student to read a book is by banning it. Banning books only makes people curious as to what is it in and makes them want to read it. Also, if they have already read the book before it is banned they will want to re-read it to find the things that were picked out of it for banning purposes.

_________________
Heather L. Heath


Sun Mar 29, 2009 9:59 pm
Profile
All-star
All-star
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:04 am
Posts: 34
Post 
I agree with what Natalie said about the authors still having their freedom of speech. A book may be banned in a certain school or district but there will still be many children who will have the opportunity to read their material. Also like everyone else has said, by banning the book it actually may ensure that children will read it simply to find out why it was banned!
I disagree with the practice of banning books because it does shelter students from many real life situations and topics that may relate to them. Sometimes it can be beneficial for a child to be introduced to a controversial topic on paper before they encounter it in real life. For example like the death of a friend, family member, etc.

_________________
Katherine Stover


Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:51 am
Profile
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 7:21 pm
Posts: 26
Post 
I think that with banned books we are telling kids that they shouldn't use their imaginations, think for themselves, or make their own decisions. I think that the whole topic of banned books is really silly. I think that if we want to really teach kids to use their brain then allowing them to explore the many realms of the mind by reading different books.

_________________
Danielle L Epley


Mon Mar 30, 2009 6:42 pm
Profile
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 1:39 pm
Posts: 25
Post 
I also agree with the statement that the fastest way to get a student to read a book is by banning it. I mean just because the book is banned does not mean the student is not going to go out and read it, it is more likely that they do. I also disagree with banning of books because like Katie said, it does shelter students from real life topics that even they might be going through and it as Danielle said it discourages them from using their imaginations. I think that if a child wants to read a book that is banned and if they can relate the book, then I don't see any problem with it.

_________________
Angela Nicole Sain


Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:24 am
Profile
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:40 pm
Posts: 20
Post 
I don't agree with banning books either. Children are not exposed to certain things if everything that might bother them is banned. Then they will grow up to be naive about certain parts of the world because their parents and the schools have sheltered them from these things. They might as well be able to learn about some things in books, because they are probably going to learn about them elsewhere anyway. It might as well be from a pretty factual location.

_________________
Megan Wright


Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:32 am
Profile
All-star
All-star
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 12:01 am
Posts: 30
Post 
I agree that banning books doesn't necessarily mean authors are not being allowed their freedom of speech. Like Natalie said, they are still able to write and publish the books. But I don't think that banning books is a good thing. I think it just causes more problems in the classroom. You can find something in every book that you may not agree with but you can't shelter students from the world or else they will never be able to grow. They won't learn to be a part of a global society, one where they have to learn to accept other cultures while still maintaining their own beliefs. I think as a teacher, you have to decide what is appropriate for the maturity levels of your students when you are reading books with the entire class, but I think that a wide variety of books should be available to students and that they should be able to choose whether they want to read a book or not.

_________________
Leslie Sheppard


Tue Mar 31, 2009 10:05 am
Profile
All-star
All-star
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 12:34 am
Posts: 33
Post 
I agree with Leslie in the fact that banning books is not a good idea and that almost everyone can find something wrong or that they disagree with in any book. I think many books like Huckleberry Finn are set in the historical time period and preserves how life was like then. If they ban books like this, students will not get exposed to different time periods in history.

_________________
Laura Davis


Wed Apr 01, 2009 8:53 pm
Profile
All-star
All-star

Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 4:06 pm
Posts: 31
Post 
I think banning books first off makes readers want to read the books to know what's so wrong with them. Also, many books that are banned are banned because of ridiculous reasons, in my opinion. I think some books are fulls of imagination and students love fantasy and "out of the norm" books that keep their interest. This is sheltering students too much and not allowing them to choose what they want to read. I think the list should be re-evaluated.

Casey Gill


Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:09 am
Profile
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 2:02 pm
Posts: 24
I think banning books is a tight topic. I think banning is ok but must be used with discretion. If a book is morally demeaning then it should be considered. There is enough negative information in the media to persuade our children to the "dark side". But, if the story gives meaning, light and hope then I think the few negative parts should be over looked. The Bible is one of the best books ever written but it has murder, rape, lying, stealing and cheating. If one looks at only the bad parts, it should be banned but instead the plot of the story as a whole is about hope, love and peace. Books should be judged by their value not their surface structure.

_________________
Ashley Rebecca Brooks


Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:31 pm
Profile
Semi-pro
Semi-pro
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 10:18 pm
Posts: 27
Post 
I think that the banned books list isn't really necessary. I agree with whoever said that by making them banned, it'll just encourage kids to read them. I was always interested in what I wasn't supposed to be. Some of the books, such as The Giver, or Bridge to Teribithia, are such good books that I am really surprised they're on there. I read several of the banned books in elementary school, and all I know is that I loved them, I wasn't offended by them. At the same time, I believe that some things in books are suitable for school, and since school is required, you shouldn't require the students to study something that is above their maturity level. If the teacher really knows the students, the teacher can make the choice and be able to support the decision for reading or not reading a certain book.

_________________
Crystal Brooke Ritchie


Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:28 pm
Profile
All-star
All-star
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 6:19 pm
Posts: 30
Post 
I agree that banning books is not a good idea. In doing so we shelter our students from real life situations that they eventually will encounter. By reading a story that addresses such issues, they can learn how to deal with these situations. For example, Bridge to Terabithia deals with the death of a little girl which some people feel is inappropriate. However, many students are going to experience the death of a classmate at some point, and books like that can help them come to terms with the situation. If a book or topic is extremely controversial and a good number of people have a problem with it, I can maybe see not reading the book as a whole class. That being said, I defintely think that the students should still have access to the book either in the school or class library. If a student wants to read it that is there choice and they should have that option.

_________________
Kimberly Marie Isidori


Tue Apr 07, 2009 8:57 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 14 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Designed by ST Software for PTF.