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 GLBTQ Language in the classroom 
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After discussing with the panel in class last week, I left with a few questions I wish I had asked. I wish I had asked them to explain some terminology, like transgender v. trans-sexual, queer, and others. I know it is basic but it is important to use. I do not want to use any language wrong and I certainly do not want to misinform my students. Another thing I was wondering was, if you have a student in elementary school call another student gay or queer and they are obviously picking on them, how do you correct this? How do you discipline the student while educating them on the fact that these words do have meanings and they are really not bad words depending on how you use them? Another issue is how do you educate elementary school students on GLBTQ issues when some parents will be absolutely against it? I feel that it is very important as teachers to educate students on every aspect of life, but it is hard when you have to respect the parents' wishes also.

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Megan Cockrum


Mon Apr 27, 2009 7:36 am
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I will throw this out there too. Most parents do not even know what to tell their own children about subjects like this. Something to look out for in the classroom are the parents who have no idea of the subjects. They will be the ones that have the most issues with controversial topics. As educators your job is not only to educate the students in the classroom but most of the time to do this effectively you must educate the parents as well. As a music teacher this can be a little easier in some cases in that you tend to be in the public eye more often with performances and other things like that. This gives you a forum to educate the parents and community. Regular classroom teachers can hold parent nights or even have days where the parents are invited to come and sit in a designated area in the classroom or even near their child so they can see the way you deal with things in your classroom. I would not suggest this in the first few years of teaching as it will most likely make your more nervous they it the principal was there doing a review. But it is a good thing to do to have an open door for not just the students but the parents as well.


Tue Apr 28, 2009 8:02 pm
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Chuck makes an interesting point about inviting the parents in a "parents' night" (or something of the like) in order to cover some of the uncomfortable topics. Keep in mind that you will not only be educating the children and their parents, but also the community and, quite possibly, your fellow colleagues. Teaching students about GLBTQ issues will have you quite possibly walking a very thing line. This is a subject that is not extremely open for discussion in many areas of the country, so there will always be a chance that SOMEBODY will be offended. Unfortunately, this particular view on GLBTQ issues will not change until society changes. I won't hold my breath for that one.... :?


Thu Apr 30, 2009 1:39 am
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