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 Just to piss someone off... 
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Just to piss people off a bit and give people someone to talk about other than "I agree".... I DO NOT ACTUALLY THINK THIS DON'T STONE ME

After talking about the genetic sex issues in class here are some thoughts...
Is it really a teachers responsibility to deal with sex? What if some student doesn't know which box to check on a official test, why should I have to deal with this? Their personal issues are not going to keep them from writing a paper or reading their textbook, so why do I need to worry? If they look like a girl, do I refer to them as a female, do I check records, do I just ignore it all and guess what they should be?

Also, which age group do you think this will be a more prominent issue in....
Elementary... no one cares about clothes
Middle Grades... starting to "change"
High school... Maybe still "changing" DATING

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Jacob


Wed Apr 02, 2008 5:41 pm
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Ah... a fellow rabble rouser. Does the heart good.

We had discussions like this during Social Class (although prompted by me) and I came to the conclusion that it doesn't matter how much money you have we have to treat everyone as equals. This philosophy was then extended to race, religion, culture, and now gender. I haven't been talkative much lately because I have nothing new to say. Dr. Turner just seems to finding new ways to make people seem different. Reality is this: you don't have to look hard to pick some controversial reason... all students are different and as a result merit individual concern, regardless.

So in answer to your question, no, {social class, race, gender} does not matter.


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Their personal issues are not going to keep them from writing a paper or reading their textbook, so why do I need to worry?


Actually it can. I rememeber is some class I was told something that resonated very well. Remember Maslow's Hierarchy of needs? Well a student who does not meet those needs cannot learn effectively. I am not saying you have to self-actualized to learn (I am certainly not to teach), but the more needs you have met the better the student can. Starts with the basic needs (food, shelter) and goes up. As a result: if there is a large emotional need that is going unmet; then student will not beable to learn and focus. Whose job is it to meet those needs? Well that is another question.


Fri Apr 04, 2008 4:28 am
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That's a hard question because it is not solely a teacher's job to address these issues but if parents are never addressing the issues who ever will and will ever make a stand to help students feel equal? When you think about all the issues that we've talked about in class they have been about differences. I feel that is is first and always the parent's responsibility to help their children feel confident in who they are but if the parents aren't doing that who will. As teachers we are taught to make our classroom a safe environment so if addressing these issues and letting your students know your stand on it and that there will be no tolerance for "hatred" in the classroom then by all means that is our job.

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Jenna F


Fri Apr 04, 2008 2:22 pm
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helping students identify their differences is the only way we are going to be able to look in the face of discrimination in this country and do something about it... so addressing these issues is one of the most important jobs we have as educators and producers of effective citizens.

Ignoring diversity only blinds us to the discrimination we all face and since when has it been an American ideal to just turn a blind eye to hate? We are a nation of fighters for the under dog and only by facing up to our flaws can we start to eradicate them.


Tue Apr 08, 2008 1:57 pm
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OK, so i am not entirely sure that this goes along with this discussion exactly. Recently in the news there has been a couple who are pregnant. However, it is the man who is pregnant, but he was actually born a woman and realized that he wanted to be a man so he began to take testosterone and became a man. But none the less has all the female parts and is carrying the baby. But he looks just like a man. I am just curious as to what everyone's thought on this situation is? I know that the couple just wants to have a baby and this was the way they chose but I just wonder what that child is going to think one day when he/she is told that their "dad" gave birth to them? is this a topic that should be discussed in the classroom? You know that child will ultimately bring it up one day and what is the role of the teacher in that situation?

just something to think about.

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Emily Nicholson


Tue Apr 08, 2008 2:13 pm
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what a difficult question. hmmm...
well to start out with what I view as the easier of the two questions: I think it is important to discuss this with the child in elementary grades for the simply fact that at that age kids often have a innocent curiosity about what makes little Tommy different from little Susan. If during this exploratory stage, a child was to be confronted with their biological differences and did not have any knowledge of what to say....things might go worse than if they at least had a base. Prominence (which I guess was the real issue) I think however, exists in the high school category. At this age, the child has to deal with dating, what to wear, who to hang out with, what has or has not developed, etc. I can't imagine what that would be like because high school is difficult enough for many without having to wrestle with one's identity.

Now-to tackle the harder one...
I think it is the teacher's responsibility to pay attention to the sex of their kids only in how it pertains to the classroom. We as teachers have the huge responsibility to create and maintain a safe and welcoming environment for all our students whether they be pink, purple, male, female, or whatever. I do agree with Jeff in that a confused student is not going to learn as well as a student that has a strong sense of self. They aren't complete in their emotional level of needs and therefore aren't going to be worried about the steps leading up to the Cold War or whatever. I think ignoring the gender and sex of a child is dangerous territory. I'm not insinuating that they should have a headdress labeling them because I mean...I wouldn't want one and I know who I am but I do think that an awareness needs to exist in the backs of our minds.

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Caitlin Troutman


Tue Apr 08, 2008 7:40 pm
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I love that you started this post, Jacob. As sympathetic as I would like to think I am, as a high school teacher helping a student with such a genetic disorder is not something I particularly want to deal with, nor is it something that I feel like I should have to deal with. I am all for guiding students towards making life choices which will promote a healthy and happy life, but I firmly believe that this is a job best left for parents/medical professionals/mental health professionals.

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Ryan Dunlevy


Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:30 pm
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I love that you started this post, Jacob. As sympathetic as I would like to think I am, as a high school teacher helping a student with such a genetic disorder is not something I particularly want to deal with, nor is it something that I feel like I should have to deal with. I am all for guiding students towards making life choices which will promote a healthy and happy life, but I firmly believe that this is a job best left for parents/medical professionals/mental health professionals.

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Ryan Dunlevy


Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:43 pm
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I think that this issue is a matter of personal choice. Many people do not feel comfortable addressing this issue with thier students and I completely understand. On the flipside however I think it is important for students to have a teacher that they feel they can come to for support and feel free to ask questions. I am not going to meddle in anyone's personal buisness especiall if they do not want to make it know to me. However, if the issue comes up I would be more than happy and willing to sit down and discuss with them whatever problems or concerns they have. I would like to be ther for them if they need someone to help them through a tough time. I am not talking about being a best friend but a mentor or a role model to those that need those people in their life. It will not effect me or how I teach one bit to address this issue with a student.

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Danielle Underwood


Thu Apr 10, 2008 7:42 am
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helping students identify their similarities is the only way we are going to able to look in the face of discrimination in this country and do something about it...

"S/He is not so different from me? Why is s/he excluded? Hey, this is wrong."[/b]


Thu Apr 10, 2008 9:53 am
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I believe that as a teacher it is partly my responsibility to worry about my students and care about their wellbeing. I'm not saying it is our responsibility to help them with the genetic sex issue, be we should be aware of the issue and try to help in any way possible and above all be understanding and accepting of the issue.

I am a B-K major am always worried about my students and children and would want to help them in anyway could. I feel that the children at this age and their teacher have close bonds, and as they get older the bond between student and teacher disappears, but most teachers go into teaching for the children, no matter the age, so it is almost contradictory that they wouldn't care or want to help their students.

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Jessica Smith


Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:06 pm
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I will always be willing to talk and help any student who needs support, someone to talk to, or just has a question about the class. However, a student's sexual preference outside of the classroom should not be a prominent issue inside my classroom. I respect each individual's sexual preference and their personal life, but that's what it is, personal. I am to stay entuned to my students needs, and that includes all my students, not just certain ones. I get paid to be many things as a public school teacher, but I have a tough time understanding how a student's sexual preference, identity, and personal life is going to help them on the EOC. There being judged by that performance during those couple of hours, and so am I. If a student's sexual orientation is becoming a classroom issue and it's becoming a more frequent topic in the room than the history of the United States then there will be a problem. Wheres the line where the teacher stops and the school counselors take over?


Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:45 am
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I am going to have to agree with Ryan on this situation. I feel that i will be there to guide my students and help them make choices in life, but when it comes to having a genetic disorder i don't think that i will be wanting to deal with it. I will be more than happy to talk with them but it is their choice and i feel that that is something that they should talk more about with their family, friends, medical doctors, and mental health professionals. On the other hand i will be open to the student if they feel they need to vent and have someone to talk to about the situation that they are going through.

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<3 Lauren


Thu May 01, 2008 6:16 pm
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